Dark Riddle (Jesus Morales) AUTHOR/ARTIST

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Dark Riddle (Jesus Morales) AUTHOR/ARTIST

Post  darkriddle1 on Tue Jan 17, 2012 4:28 am

MINI-BIO:
Dark Riddle (Jesus Morales) gained local fame as a popular Chicago Graffiti Artist, hailing from Gothicane, the ghetto regions of Pilsen and Little Village. He then turned to a credible career in occult art and writing. He is known primarily for the style of both art and writing called “Hypergothics” a method of blending psychological and subliminal messages in his work. As a freehand and digital artist, his combination with spray paint, ink, and photography, is merged with literature in weird and exciting ways. In the occult culture, he is known as the 7th "Dark" from the Synoptic Knights Templar.


Hypergothics Exhibited: by Dark Riddle

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Hypergothics explained and exhibited by Dark Riddle:


Hypergothic writing came directly from Hypergothic art. When Dark Riddle began to hide symbolic imagery in the inking and shades of his artwork, he proceeded to find a way to do the same in writing, hoping to get similar atmospheric and subliminal effects. By the late 90’s, he succeeded.

Here are some samples of Hypergothics; they are placed below as excerpts from various works.

(Below) This poem below is hidden in the excerpt: Can you find it?

The cold can consume you if you feel the pulse of Cthulhu.
Its tentacles rasp at your soul, even as you peep these runes.

(Below - The actual paragraphs from one of the pages) Pay close attention to the words in blue.

The Antarctic cold marched on as it always had. Some said there were times when it can freeze a man’s heart. Solid and blizzard-bruised, it can consume you, man, and creature alike. Perhaps if you let it coil around your will, you’ll fall into its icy eternity. Nevertheless, Walter Folsom ventured there. He dared nature and nature’s bet was high. In long travels past, he heard tales of it. …The one - The strange - The powerful. Yet he never dared it. No. Not it. He gazed upon eyes so bleak and barren that if you hesitated for too long, the sting of fear might never leave you. Indeed, he could feel a throbbing of his heart in the cold - In the barren. Perhaps the pulse of his veins pumped too rampantly? Perhaps it was something else? Cthulhu. Could a bitterer demon braze the frost? Walter scraped ice from his spectacles. …This time seeing tendrils - its tentacles reaching for him - in him - through him. Hark, a blurry rasp at the tent’s door now. Was it his calling – your calling? Only the soul, if a soul could exist here, knew. Yet even as he wept rivers of ice, the demon drew closer and upon his corpse might you peep the mark? Cunning were these runes of the otherly, to the sane they meant nothing, but to those cursed, they made men see.

Below is a subliminal sentence that is “not” poetic but is embedded in the paragraph to enhance the theme of the atmosphere. Once again, pay attention to the words in blue; as they spell out exactly the hidden sentence.


Mallory stopped at the door, if she’d gone into the dark all the way, she would have screamed.


Mallory used her senses well. Something stopped at the base of the old house. The door was old, grey and awash with rust. Even so, she grew curious. She knew that if the house was barren, no one was there, so what’s to be afraid of? Perhaps she’d gone too far; too far from her native state of consciousness. But no, it was her destiny to move into the future, to see what lay beyond the veil. No obstacle could keep her in the dark. She figured it was time to go all the way, knowing full well that spirits didn’t haunt this place. But if she would have thought about the times past, she could never bring herself into the present. She once screamed, for joy…and for fear.

Another trick of Hypergothics is grouping “synonyms” in the very same paragraph. This allows the author to repeat the meaning or a word without actually repeating the word itself. Below, the blue letters highlighted mean the same thing, but don’t stifle the flow of the writing. This is especially effective when focusing on suspenseful or atmospheric parts of a story.

Paul found the strange place ominous. He could not understand some of the portentous actions of the fishermen at the dock. Could such threatening omens be of any use to him? He was a man of science, yet it appeared that evil did spread a menacing hand here.

Lastly, and probably the most hard to decipher, are the purposely “broke-linkage” of words. Below is an example of broke-linked tactics, where two separated words actually form one word when pushed together. Look for the sentence below, hidden in blue text.

Swords dark sin grated against her face

Stella pointed at cars words would find hard to describe. The concept show featured ark grooves inset among rated new styles. It was a gain staple thought, but not too far from the norm. Other staff aced such exhibitions with their own models, but this would do for now.


During the late 80’s and early 90’s Riddle created Hypergothics. Hypergothic writing or “Painting With Words” as it is sometimes referred as, is a form of writing that was meant to give readers a much-boosted sense of atmosphere, which does appear in almost all of Dark Riddle’s writings. Unfortunately, it could be used negatively for “propaganda” purposes, which is why Hypergothic writing as a new form of scribe, is somewhat controversial, even now, in its infancy. It is however keen to remember that Riddle is an artist, not a "true" writer. Dark Riddle often cites that he uses Hypergothics and art in his writing to compensate for his lack of true writing skill.


Last edited by darkriddle1 on Tue Jan 17, 2012 4:44 am; edited 2 times in total

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Re: Dark Riddle (Jesus Morales) AUTHOR/ARTIST

Post  H.B.I.C. on Tue Jan 17, 2012 4:35 am

Aw now you're just being too modest! I think it takes real talent to write in this style, and I admire your ability to pull it off with such finesse! I'm really digging it!
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Re: Dark Riddle (Jesus Morales) AUTHOR/ARTIST

Post  darkriddle1 on Tue Jan 17, 2012 4:42 am

Thanks, but even though I'm highly recognized for the style, it is NOT considered good. In fact, it's often referred to as "gimmick" writing, mainly on the premise that it is not technical writing.

I actually agree with them on the "technical" part. I have no education in writing or the arts and I'm a very poor technical writer. So, I invent odd tactics to compensate for my weak writing skills. ...Sad but true. LOL.

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Re: Dark Riddle (Jesus Morales) AUTHOR/ARTIST

Post  H.B.I.C. on Tue Jan 17, 2012 11:23 am

I'm not against "gimmicks". As long as it works and doesn't come across as corny. I like the way you do it, and to be honest I probably wouldn't recognize it consciously if you hadn't pointed it out. If it was more obvious, then I could understand the "hate". Then it would seem like you were relying on the gimmick too much. And as far as "technical" writing goes, snobbery doesn't belong in the horror genre. While I agree that a manuscript should be clean and have a great story, you still have to consider the audience. They are not there to read War and Peace.

I'm going on record here saying that there are some who overwork their stories, and it suffers because of it. I'm saying this as a fan and not a writer. Reader's opinions are the only ones that really count in the end.
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Re: Dark Riddle (Jesus Morales) AUTHOR/ARTIST

Post  darkriddle1 on Tue Jan 17, 2012 3:01 pm

I understand what you mean. I know a lot of contemporary writers that have a certain goal -that goal is almost identical to every other writers' today; "the get fame, get paid goal." In tow, they feel that they need to lock-in their efforts in a very technically appropriate style.

I don't think there's anything wrong with that. But this is NOT my goal. I was inspired by authors of the old age, like H.G Wells, and Jules Verne. Later it was Ray Bradbury and Rod Serling.

The precedent set here was not so much on getting paid, but getting recognition for contributing innovative methods and styles to appease the reading/viewing audience.

In the entire modern venue of literature, there is hardly any contributions to stylized writing - by large, it's all "technical" writing, or efforts to mimic successful popular authors of the modern age.

But not too long ago, there was a time when authors dropped the stigma of technical frame and wrote in their own personal verse, prose, and style.

This could be seen in people like Mark Twain, and much later, Anthony Burgess, Stanislaw Lem, and Frank Miller, all writers that marked a particular style of writing, though criticized for their unorthodox methods.


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Re: Dark Riddle (Jesus Morales) AUTHOR/ARTIST

Post  tldecay on Thu Feb 23, 2012 1:52 am

I am from across the river from you, and a bit south. I am from the surounding counties of St. Louis Mo. Howdy neighbor.

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